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Solar-powered LED lights helping impoverished communities

A solar-powered LED light manufacturer is helping alleviate poverty in Pakistan by donating LED lights to villagers, reducing reliance on toxic kerosene lamps.

The program is called Pehli Kiran, which means ‘First Ray of Light,’ and is run by LEDtronics.

Pehli Kiran is part of LEDtronics’ Global Citizenship initiative, which aims to help “impoverished families worldwide with opportunities for better health, safety, education, and more via donations processed through the American Fund for Human Development.”

“We are taking our thirty-plus years of experience and expertise in the LED industry and using it to help those in need around the world,” said Pervaiz Lodhie, Global Citizenship Co-founder.

“Through our nation-building initiatives, we provide the underprivileged with hope and opportunity for better lives. Doing so not only leads to socio-economic development in their area, but also to a stronger, closer and better world for all,” he continued.


Credit: LEDtronics' Global Citizenship Initiative

Credit: LEDtronics’ Global Citizenship Initiative


The Pehli Kiran program is simple – the company donates solar-powered LED lights to villagers, worth about $2.33 each.

These lights reduce the need for kerosene lamps, which require costly and toxic kerosene. The LED lights allow for more hours of light for parents to work, increasing household income, and provides light for children to improve their education.

And so far, almost 1500 families have benefited from the program, saving about $10,000 by moving away from kerosene lamps. LEDtronics also estimates, in aggregate, these families have increased annual income by over $450,000, with a total expected increase of over $2.2 million based on a five-year life expectancy of the LEDs.

“Pehli Kiran gives poverty-stricken families freedom from darkness, illiteracy, poverty, hunger, and disease,” said Lodhie.

“But this is just the beginning. With the launch of our Global Citizenship website and social media venues, we hope more people will learn about these charitable programs, make donations and help impoverished families worldwide lead better lives,” he said.

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